Causes of Congestive Heart Failure

The most common causes of congestive heart failure include coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, or diabetes. Underlying conditions can also lead to the condition. For example, one out of every three people with heart failure also has diabetes. Other possible causes include diseases of the heart muscle, irregular heart rhythms, drug abuse, or thyroid disorders.

What Are the Causes of Congestive Heart Failure?

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is caused by other diseases or conditions that damage or overwork the heart muscle. Over time, the heart muscle weakens and is not able to pump blood as well as it should.
 
The leading congestive heart failure causes are:
 
Coronary artery disease, including angina and heart attack, is the most common underlying cause of congestive heart failure. People who have a heart attack are at high risk of developing congestive heart failure.
 
Most people with heart failure also have high blood pressure, and about one out of every three people with heart failure also has diabetes.
 

Other Congestive Heart Failure Causes

Other conditions and factors that can cause congestive heart failure include:
 
  • Cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart muscle)
  • Diseases of the heart valves
  • Abnormal heartbeats or arrhythmias
  • Congenital heart disease (a heart defect or problem you are born with)
  • Treatments for cancer, such as radiation and certain chemotherapy drugs
  • Thyroid disorders -- having either too much or too little thyroid hormone in the body
  • Alcohol abuse
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cocaine and other illegal drug use.
     
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Information on Congestive Heart Failure

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